How to Train a Dog to Stop Jumping on People

Having a dog to share love and trust with is one of the best things in life. It’s easy to let go of the little things our dog does when they get super excited or happy to see you. Many of us have had our dogs since they were puppies, and that’s where a lot of habits start cementing in their behavior.

One of them is jumping on people. Whether they are super happy to see you when you get back from school or work, or they want something really badly, jumping on you might seem cute and harmless when they are small, but it can be a dangerous behavior when dealing with big sized dogs.

Even if your dog can’t possibly do any harm by jumping on people, it’s still a behavior you will want to correct, and not just to save your clothes from muddy paw prints or dog hairs.

 

Why Do Dogs Jump on People?

The main motivation for a dog to jump on someone is to greet them, as they would normally greet other dogs, face-to-face. Naturally, some people might get scared or uncomfortable when that happens, which can lead to punishment for the dog.

If this chain of events is repeated, the dog might actually develop an aversion towards visitors, and display aggressive behavior instead. You can see why it’s best to encourage “polite greetings” through dog training, and prevent any incident.

 

How to Train Your Dog to Stop Jumping

First of all, when it comes to eliminating such a natural habit, you need to be very consistent when the behavior is displayed. Ignoring the dog when it jumps does help, as long as everyone in the house keeps doing that, with no exception. Also, keep your dog from jumping on strangers on the street, as they might be tolerant of it and encourage the behavior without realizing it.

Punishment is never a good solution in the long run, as it can trigger other bad behaviors, but what’s to do if ignoring the jumping doesn’t help? The best way to eliminate jumping is to show your dog what to do instead: greeting politely. Have your dog sit before he meets a visitor, keep it behind a training gate or a pen, and keep the atmosphere calm.

Persistence is key, and understanding that your dog doesn’t mean harm when it’s doing that. Encouraging wanted behavior and not paying (positive or negative) attention to the jumping will, eventually, get you rid of it.

If you have tried these methods with your dog, but it’s still jumping on your guests or your kids, you can try a dog training session at Dog Dayz of California. The experts there will help you train your dog in a respectful, effective way, and show you how to get your dog to understand your commands.

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